A Keling Lexicon Q – Z

Telinga Keling, Silver Halide Print, Niranjan Rajah, 1999. Permanent Collection of the National Visual Art Gallery, Kuala Lumpur

A Keling Lexicon A – J
A Keling Lexicon K – P

Q
R
Raja Keling
Rakyat Keling
Rama Keling
Rojak Keling
Roti Keling
Rendang Keling
S
Sembah Keling
Sembang Keling
Sireh Keling
(Kayu) Sono Keling
Subang Keling
Sungai Keling
T
Tanah Keling
Tanjung Keling
Taubat Keling
Telinga Keling
Temberang Keling
Terup Keling
U
Ubi Keling
Ugut Keling
Usada (Pengubatan) Keling
V
W

Wayang Keling
X
Y
Z

Addendum: Keling words with no Indian reference (happy to be corrected)
Keling Gawai
Paku Keling
Pasang Keling


A Keling Lexicon A – J

Telinga Keling, Silver Halide Print, Niranjan Rajah, 1999. Permanent Collection of the National Visual Art Gallery, Kuala Lumpur

A Keling Lexicon K – P
A Keling Lexicon Q – Z

A
Akal Keling
Anak Keling (Bermain Api)
Auta Keling
Ayam Keling
B
Babi Keling
Keling Balik (India)
Keling Bang (Azan)
Bawang (Merah) Keling
Belanga Keling
Benua Keling
Beras Keling
(Sang) Bhramana Keling
Keling Bodoh
(Anak-putu) Bono Keling
Keling Botol
Bukit Keling (Johor)
Bunuh Keling
Butuh Keling
C
Cempaka Keling
Cakap (Macam) Keling
Cucak Keling
D
Doktor Keling
E
F
G
(Ikan) Gelama Keling
Gelung Keling
Gempar Keling
Gendang Keling
Gertak Keling
Gerantang Keling
(Kerja) Golok Keling
Gulai Keling
(Tari) Keling Gunojoyo
Gunting (Rambut) Keling
H
Hulubalang Keling
Keling Hindu
I
Keling Islam
J
Jambu Keling
Janji Keling
Keling (Teater) Jikey

Dari Pusat Tasek 18

The Dari Pusat Tasek, exhibition at Percha Art Space runs till 19 JAN 2020.

The enormous tree at the centre the ‘Pusat Tasek’. is an known as the Pokok Pauh Janggi. While I have been insisting that this is a mango tree, I have to acknowledge that the more commonly held view is that it is a coco de mer palm. Still, pauh is the Malay word for ‘mango’ and as Paul Kekai Manansala suggests janggi, probably, derives from the Toroja word ‘djjandji’ which, like the Malay ‘buah’, means ‘fruit’.

The Toraja are a people from the Sulawesi island, to the Southeast of Borneo, whose ancestral myths seem to claim origins from an island somewhere to the north where there is a powerful current, which could possibly be the Pusat Tasek. In the Taroja language taripa djandji means ‘mango tree,’ where or taripa  means ‘mango’ and djandji , derived from djampu means ‘fruit’. In suggesting that the Toraja taripa djandji is the more original form of Pauh Janggi , Manansala points out that among the Bare’e people, also from Sulawesi, taripa djandji is the common way of saying ‘mango tree.’

Manasala also notes that Antonio Pigafetta, a mariner on Ferdinand Magellan’s  pioneering voyage of ‘discovery’ (1518-1522), mentions local tales of an island surrounded by whirlpools, somewhere north or south of Java Major (Borneo), called Puzathaer (Pusat air?) on which there was a very large tree in whose branches perch enormous birds called Garuda. The fruit of this tree was said to be ‘larger than a cucumber.’ This size comparison, which must surely be with the in terms of the chayote cucumber from the Americas, suggests that the tree concerned was, indeed, a mango tree. The nut of the coco de mer is very much larger.

In Malay, of course, Pokok Pauh Janggi refers only to the mythical tree. A quotidian Mango tree would be pokok pauh and the coco de mer is referred as kelapa laut. While none of this is conclusive, in my understanding of language and of myth, the fact that, even when the signifier ‘Pauh Janggi‘, is understood as an index for the signified ‘coco de mer‘, the fact that it is indexed via the word ‘pauh‘, confirms that the root of chain of signifieds or similes is, indeed, the ‘mango’.

http://sambali.blogspot.com/2008/04/kuroshio-current-and-navel-of-sea.html